Pierre Gervois: “Chinese Millennial Tourists in the U.S. might prefer to read travel-related content in English”

Chinese Millennial tourist - Gervois magazineThey speak English now (Just in case you didn’t notice).

They are the millennial Chinese travelers in the United States.

They are the Chinese tourists coming to discover the United States of America and to buy high quality Made in USA products.

They are the Chinese businessmen and businesswomen coming to invest in American companies and create U.S. jobs.

They are the smart Chinese millennial entrepreneurs coming to America to create start ups and contribute to America’s leadership in future technologies.

They are the Chinese guests fed up to be disrespected in luxury hotels when asking if they really can afford to pay for a suite when they ask for one and are offered first the cheapest room available.

They are the Chinese businessmen walking into a bespoke suit company in New York City and asking for a hand made in America suit because they also deserve to wear the finest clothes. (No, they are not only interested in “I Love NY” Made in China T-shirts)

They are the Chinese travelers annoyed to be depicted by U.S. marketing agencies as using only Chinese social media networks such as Weibo and WeChat, when they are actually using Instagram, Twitter and Facebook to stay in touch with their U.S. friends and freely discover the world.

They are the tourists who have spent $40Billion in the U.S. in 2016

They are the LGBTQ+ Chinese travelers wanting to be as respected as any other tourist and find safe places to just be who they are.

They are the Chinese shoppers who find utterly ridiculous when Western luxury brands add a dragon or a Chinese symbol on a watch or a handbag and expect that they’ll specifically want to buy this model.

They are the Chinese tourists who are grateful for the warm welcome they have received by American people when they were doing horseback riding or cowboy shooting. (Yes, they are not only obsessed by shopping in large shopping malls but want to discover the various aspects of America’s culture and heritage).

They are the Chinese travelers who are proud of their Chinese cultural heritage and Chinese language, but who also speak English and prefer to read in English original stories about the United States.

They are the Chinese travelers who are fluent in English and understand exactly what some people say about them when they are traveling overseas.

Actually, they are exactly the same as any other traveler in America.

By Pierre Gervois, Founder of Gervois Hotel Rating, Publisher of Gervois Magazine, Hospitality & tourism keynote speaker and expert about marketing to outbound Chinese tourists.

 

U.S. Retailers now more widely accept WeChat Pay and Alipay, China’s leading mobile payment solutions

WeChatPay - China Elite FocusCitcon, the integrated payment and marketing platform, announced a strategic partnership to enable brands in North America to accept WeChat Pay and Alipay.

WeChat Pay and Alipay are the most popular and convenient payment options for Chinese consumers to purchase goods and services. Adding these payment options to retail point of sale allows brands to now tap into an even larger revenue stream from Chinese consumers who are the largest spender, and fastest growing traveler segment to the North America. The platform enables brands to optimize revenue growth without the costs and hassles of establishing a business entity in China.

WeChat Pay is a fully integrated payment solution within WeChat, the world’s most popular mobile social communications service with 936 million active users and Alipay is a super lifestyle app run by Ant Financial Services Group with more than 450 million active users. Together these platforms jointly account for 90% of China’s mobile payment market share. Both super apps allow users to book a trip, hail a taxi, order food, purchase movie tickets, pay for water and electricity bills, manage investments, perform transactions on e-commerce websites and more to create a cashless society.

“China is changing fast. Mobile payment is the new frontier of commerce and China is leading this trend. By providing an integrated and easy-to-use payment solution, Citcon is creating a future that takes payment and marketing to the next level, empowering global merchants to drive business growth with millions of Chinese consumers.”said Chuck Huang, Founder and CEO of Citcon

As the first payment partner of WeChat Pay and Alipay, in addition to major credit cards such as UnionPay, MasterCard, Visa, Discover and American Express, Citcon is a one-stop shop for merchants to connect with Chinese consumers and accept payments anywhere. Citcon’s stand-alone mobile point-of-sale (mPOS), easy-to-integrate API and software products empower merchants to optimize growth both online and offline, with an easy and affordable rate compared to credit card processing. In addition to the convenient payment solutions, merchants will also be able to gain in-depth consumer behavior insights, manage business performance, run marketing campaigns, guides users to merchants stores while saving their shopping preferences for future visits and manage lifetime customer loyalty programs.

“Accepting WeChat Pay is a smart move for U.S. Retailers. That will definitely help with the category of budget-conscious Chinese travelers who choose to travel in groups. But they must keep in mind that the most affluent categories prefer to pay with their international credit cards, who show their status when traveling overseas and offer more perks in terms of miles and reward points.” commented Pierre Gervois, CEO of China Elite Focus Magazines LLC, a media group specialized in luxury travel publications for very affluent Chinese outbound travelers.

Source: Citcon

U.S. Retail brands too much focused on Chinese Mobile payment systems and forget to create an emotional connection with affluent Chinese millennial travelers

The growing purchasing power of affluent Chinese travelers is making it more important than ever for luxury brands to adopt marketing strategies to target them. With Chinese third-party mobile payment systems like Alipay and WeChat Pay beginning to set up shop in popular global tourist destinations, catering to this traveling consumer is becoming easier to do, but it’s not a brand’s only option.

Digital intelligence firm L2’s recent report “Cross-Border and Travel Retail: Connecting Digitally with China’s Shoppers” discusses ways brands can be targeting consumers online both during their journey overseas and before they set off.

“[Luxury brands] are under-serving the traveling Chinese consumer, whether it’s through their own brand site and its functionality and capability, their WeChat acShanghai Travelers Club - Bloomingdale's - Jacky interviewcount, or from leveraging things like WeChat Pay and Alipay,” said Danielle Bailey, head of Asia Pacific Research at L2. “It’s a huge missed opportunity for them to not engage on these platforms that Chinese consumers are using all the time. Their phone is their number one travel accessory.”

Brands that do engage consumers digitally abroad with an omnichannel approach are using platforms like Alipay’s “Overseas Travel Channel (支付宝境外游)” to give travelers exclusive gifts, better exchange rates, or let them find deals near where they’re going, all within the app on their mobile device. WeChat’s website within an app feature gives consumers the opportunity to reserve a product online to pick up in a store and access store locators in their own language that they can hand to a taxi driver en route.
But about half of Chinese travelers are doing research on what they want to buy abroad before they leave, and luxury brands have been adopting strategies to target these consumers, according to L2.

In a dissent opinion, Pierre Gervois, Publisher of the STC magazine, a digital travel media in Chinese Mandarin, said “The most important for retailers is not the way Chinese shoppers are going to pay. It’s a technicality. Chinese Customers who want to make a purchase have plenty of options: Cash, credit Cards or WeChat Pay.  The really important thing to do is to convince them to choose a particular retailer”
“Too oftenly, we see U.S. retailers being obsessed by Chinese mobile payment systems when their strategy should be focused on branding their image to Chinese millennial travelers, and create an emotional connection with their future customers, based on their brand values”, Gervois added.

A good starting point is to provide an international store locator on their official online store in China, a strategy about 72 percent of brands employ. However, brands can also take it a step further by adding a Chinese-language travel retail site that let shoppers research the products, compare prices, read reviews, view maps that direct them to duty free shops, and even let them purchase the product online in advance so that they can simply pick it up at the airport if they’re in a hurry.
To help consumers find these pages, brands are paying for search term generated Baidu ads. L2 lists the efforts of beauty brands as an example—many brands pay for cosmetics-related key words, while others, like Lancôme, are taking a more travel-centric approach, targeting consumers researching phrases like “South Korean vacationSTC Bloomingdales 05.”

Some high end retailers, such as Bloomingdale’s, choose a more qualitative approach, and advertise in luxury digital travel publications about the U.S., like the STC magazine, available for mobile but also in digital inflight entertainment.

While maintaining an engaging physical presence in airports and shopping malls is always important for marketing to the Chinese shopper abroad, brands that understand how to make the most of China’s digital sphere are likely going to more efficiently connect with Chinese travelers who are in the process of creating their luxury goods shopping list for their next overseas vacation.

Source: Jing Daily / Skift

In a twist, Trump’s administration policies could deliver more Chinese tourists and students for Australia & New Zealand

CHinese woman at home - China elite focusAustralia’s tourism and education providers may benefit from Chinese consumers holding a more negative view of the United States since the election of President Donald Trump, according to a new survey.

While China’s state media has pulled back on its outright hostility towards Mr Trump since his election, the survey of 2000 people from across the country found that 41 per cent of respondents viewed America in a less positive light.

“America’s soft power has historically provided a distinct advantage for many of its products and services in China, driving preference for travel and study packages, Nike shoes, iPhones and Frappuccinos at Starbucks,” said Mark Tanner the managing director of digital consulting firm China Skinny, which jointly commissioned the survey with research firm Findoout.

He said many Chinese people believed Europe to be unsafe, due to the threat of terrorism, and would therefore seek out other western-style destinations, such as Australia and New Zealand.

“The desirability of tourism and studying in America has decreased since Trump was elected,” said Mr Tanner.

“This isn’t just good for the travel and education sectors [in Australian and New Zealand], but has a wider impact as Chinese consumers develop affinities with food, property, fashion, health and a host of other products when visiting foreign countries.”

The so-called daigou trade, which has seen a spike in popularity of everything from A2 infant formula to Weetbix and Blackmores vitamins, was built around tourists coming to Australia and discovering these brands.

Many took the products home and then sought out Chinese friends or relatives living in Australia to send them regular supplies via the post.

This spawned a multimillion-dollar industry and often provided the basis for brands opening offices in China and beginning direct sales.

“New Zealand is a very popular destination for affluent Chinese travelers” said Pierre Gervois, CEO of China Elite Focus, the media agency which was in charge of the “Luxury New Zealand” campaign to promote the country to Chinese travelers from 2011 to 2013. “Chinese leisure travelers, real estate investors, businesspeople and students are choosing New Zealand as an alternative to European destinations or the United States”. The survey by China Skinny and Findoout found 18 per cent of Chinese consumers felt more negatively about buying property and stocks in the US, while 14 per cent were less inclined to travel there and 10 per cent were more negative on studying in the US.

Conversely, the rise of Mr Trump appears to have piqued interest in American culture in China with a small uptick in sentiment towards US movies, music, sport and the media. Chinese consumers have historically shown themselves to be sensitive towards geopolitical ructions. In September 2012 during a heated territorial dispute with Tokyo, Japanese automakers suffered year on year sales declines of up to 50 per cent in an otherwise buoyant market.

“Remarkably the results were consistent across respondents’ city tiers, gender, age and professions, signalling that Trump is impacting behaviour in every corner of China,” said Yu Bowei the chief executive of Findoout.

Source : Financial Review, original story by Angus Grigg

Pierre Gervois: What Chinese Travelers Want

Hospitality guru Pierre Gervois on how to cater to Chinese tourists.

PIerre Gervois TV Interview News China 2016

Marriott hotels rush to invest in China, maybe too fast.

Chinese photographer- China Elite FocusThe Chinese economy may be slowing but tourist numbers are still growing, prompting international hospitality giants to place bullish bets on the sector by opening new hotels and cruise routes.

Marriott International and Royal Caribbean Cruises are among companies looking to cater to a rapidly growing number of wealthy Chinese who are not only spending more at home but also flocking overseas, executives from the companies told CNBC.

“Outbound Chinese travelers are still growing faster than the economy in China, so we don’t see the same thing that everyone is talking with the economy happening with the Chinese travelers,” said Marriott International’s president and managing director for Asia Pacific, Craig Smith.

Over the week-long Lunar New Year holidays, room revenue growth in Marriott resorts within China rose 12 percent from a year ago, Smith told CNBC’s Squawk Box on Wednesday.

To target fast-growing middle class Chinese who will not just need leisure but business accommodation, Marriott and China’s Eastern Crown Hotels signed an agreement recently to open 100 mid-scale Fairfield by Marriott hotels in mainland China by 2021. Another 40 hotels are slated to open later.

Intercultural aspects are also important: “U.S. hotel chains like Marriott should carefully analyze what Chinese travelers want. A common misconception is that Chinese travelers are interested in cheap, mid-range hotels.” said Pierre Gervois, CEO of China Elite Focus Magazines LLC, a publishing & consulting company based in New York. “The truth is that most of Chinese travelers are ready and willing to pay for five star premium hotels, and are tired of these stereotypes” added Pierre Gervois. “Marriot should focus more on attracting High Net Worth Chinese in their U.S. five star properties rather than investing in hastily strategized risky ventures in Mainland China ” he concluded.Gervois Rating Banner 01

As for outbound travel, Chinese tourists undertook more than 120 million trips overseas in 2015, according to the China National Tourism Administration. That number is expected to grow by 11 percent this year, Smith added.

To tap this growing market, Royal Caribbean Cruises will in April launch cruise ship Ovation of the Seas, with Tianjin as the home port.

Royal Caribbean is upbeat on the nascent cruise industry in China even though it is likely to capture just a fraction of the vacation traffic—typically 2 percent globally—said president and chief executive officer of Royal Caribbean Cruises, Adam Goldstein.

With over 100 million outbound departures a year, there are “not enough ships based in China right now … to even take 2 percent of the outbound travelers”.

There are just about one million cruise passengers in China now, he added.

Sources: CNBC / Huilen Tang / The New Chinese Tourist / Chinese Tourists in America

Follow CNBC International on Twitter and Facebook.

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U.S. Luxury Retailers now targeting smartly very affluent Chinese travelers

Bloomingdales - Shanghai Travelers - Club campaignWe have all seen these cheezy advertising campaigns made by department stores or western brands trying to attract Chinese tourists in the last years: Be assured that affluent Chinese tourists were also smiling…  But it is going to change. Exit the low quality shopping publications targeted to Chinese tourists that ended in the hotel rooms trash bins. U.S. and European Luxury brands and high end retailers start now to advertise seriously with affluent Chinese tourists.

Although luxury sales in mainland China have still remained in slowdown mode in 2015, and Hong Kong has recorded a significant slump as well, Chinese spending remains a potent force in the global luxury industry, propping up growth rates in developed markets worldwide.
This week, Hermès reported a 22 percent increase in global sales in the second quarter, with sales in Japan leaping 33 percent—a figure attributed in large part to an influx of big-spending Chinese tourists attracted by a weaker yen and easier travel. On a global scale, Chinese travelers are spending lavishly: a recent Global Blue report found that Chinese tourist spending jumped 87.8 percent in June, while spending on leather goods in Europe grew by an even more staggering 93.7 percent. Year-to-date spending growth sits at a whopping 110 percent.
These numbers contrast sharply with the situation in mainland China and Hong Kong, one that is particularly striking in formerly triumphant Hong Kong. Last week, Burberry reported a “double-digit percentage decline” there for the three months ending in June, while sales of Swiss watches in the former British colony were down 21.2 percent in June, despite 3.3 percent growth worldwide.

GERVOIS magazine Advertising and sponsored content opportunitiesThese numbers further support the trend that growth is following Chinese tourists abroad, and brands need to keep up with their changing location preferences for travel—engaging outbound shoppers before they leave China and when they arrive overseas. Recent stats also illustrate the ever-shifting tides of Chinese travel patterns. Whereas Japan was, just a few years ago, faced with a Chinese tourist slump (caused in no small part by Sino-Japanese political tensions), the country is seeing a wave of Chinese arrivals and spending, owing to cooling attitudes toward Hong Kong and South Korea’s currency fluctuations and MERS outbreak.
Amid these rapid and unpredictable changes, what is clear is that brands need to have plans in place to quickly jump on opportunities, and ensure they’re able to reach and influence the Chinese outbound consumer wherever he or she happens to be in the world.
“Luxury retailers like Bloomingdale’s have well understood the importance of targeting affluent Chinese tourists”, said Pierre Gervois, CEO of China Elite Focus and Publisher of the Shanghai Travelers’ Club magazine, a high end publication in Chinese language for High Net Worth Chinese global travelers. “Bloomindale’s and the Shanghai Travelers’ Club magazine have launched a very creative marketing and PR campaign this spring showing actual Chinese customers and what it feels like to shop at the iconic Bloomingdale’s store in NYC.” Gervois added. This campaign has generated a considerable attention on Chinese social media and is the first ever campaign focused on the Chinese customer and the overall shopping experience in a U.S. luxury retailer. An example to follow for the industry.

Source: Jing Daily / China Elite Focus / The New Chinese Tourist

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