Chinese Tourists Expected to Spend $264 Billion a Year by 2019

chinese monaco

Chinese tourist in Monaco / Courtesy of the Shanghai Travelers’ Club magazine.

Buy your holiday now, before a wave of 174 million Chinese tourists snap up the best bargains.

Already the most prolific spenders globally, the number of Chinese outbound tourists is tipped to soar further as the millennial generation spreads its wings.

Here are the numbers: 174 million Chinese tourists are tipped to spend $264 billion by 2019 compared with the 109 million who spent $164 billion in 2014, according to a new analysis by Bank of America Merrill Lynch. To put that in perspective, there were just 10 million Chinese outbound tourists in 2000.

How much is $264 billion” It’s about the size of Finland’s economy and bigger than Greece’s.

“China-mania spread globally in the past few years, akin to when the Japanese started travelling some 30 years ago, when the world went into frenzy then, pandering to Japanese customers’ needs,” the analysts wrote. “In our view, this is going to be bigger and will last longer given China’s population of 1.3 billion vs Japan’s population of 127 million.”

Millennials, or 25- to 34- year olds, are expected to make up the bulk of Chinese tourists at 35% of the total, followed by 15- to 24-year olds accounting for around 27%.

GERVOIS magazine Advertising and sponsored content opportunitiesOnly about 5% of China’s 1.3 billion populace are thought to hold passports, meaning the potential for outbound tourism is vast.

The projected boom could be good news for the global economy. The Chinese are the world’s biggest consumers of luxury goods, with half of that spending done overseas. Chinese visitors to the U.S. have risen more than 10% since 2009, the fastest pace for a destination outside of Asia. Australia, France and Italy are also popular.

Asian markets stand to benefit, with the biggest uptick tipped for Japan, South Korea and Southeast Asia, according to the research led by Billy Ng in Hong Kong.

Source: Enda Curran / Bloomberg. All rights reserved

 

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Chinese outbound tourists adjust their spending: More luxury experiences, less luxury shopping

art-Chinese-Tourists-Sydney-620x349China Confidential, a Financial Times research service, estimates that total spending by Chinese travellers on outbound trips hit Rmb3.1tn ($498bn) in 2014. Spending by Chinese tourists is now greater than total spending on household consumption of around $436bn in Indonesia and $442bn in Turkey. And this figure is even more remarkable given that the Chinese outbound tourism trend is at a relatively early stage. Although the number of Chinese outbound trips grew 20 per cent year-on-year to 117m in 2014, according to official tourism statistics, less than 6 per cent of the population hold a passport.

China Confidential’s estimate for total spending is higher than the official estimate of $200bn, which excludes spending on flights, visas and other items. But the figures are in line with those from other external sources. They closely match estimates of non-educational spending by Chinese visitors to the US, for example, by the US National Tourism Office.
However, while the amount of current spending and the potential for growth remain enormous, there are signs that many travellers are starting to cut back on spending while overseas as their priorities change.
In particular, China Confidential’s latest annual report on outbound tourism, released this week and based on a survey of 1,288 outbound tourists and 40 travel agencies nationwide, identified a 6.2 per cent year-on-year slowdown in per capita spending on travellers’ outbound trips during 2015, following a 9.4 per cent decline between 2013 and 2014. The most recent contraction was led by an 8 per cent year-on-year decline in spending on shopping.

The lower spend on shopping is in part related to domestic conditions. The general macroeconomic slowdown may have prompted some travellers to rein in their spending during overseas trips, while Beijing’s anti-corruption drive has resulted in a marked reduction in gifting purchases among wealthier travellers in particular.
However, it would be wrong to view this slowdown purely in macro or policy terms. Instead, lower spending on shopping is part of a broader shift in spending priorities, with wealthier travellers increasingly prioritising experiences over luxury purchases. On average, travellers in the high-income cohort spent 31.1 per cent more than they had a year earlier on entertainment and 78.6 per cent more on other services including car rental and excursions. Those making purchases are increasingly opting for more affordable or lesser known brands, echoing trends seen domestically.

STC magazine - Gervois Hotel Rating CoverThese shifting priorities should broaden the potential beneficiaries of the Chinese outbound trend beyond the luxury retailers that have been the chief winners to date. Rising spending on experiences should benefit hospitality, entertainment and tourism service industries to a far greater extent than in the past, when many Chinese overseas travellers scrimped on hotels, food and activities to spend more at the shops. And the beneficiaries will not just be the big-name hoteliers, restaurateurs and tourist attractions, with many travellers seeking to ditch the growing crowds of fellow countrymen and venture off the beaten track.
China’s outbound journey has plenty of mileage left to run. Understanding rapidly shifting tastes and spending patterns will be key to capitalising on this long-term growth story.

Copyright : The Financial Times Limited 2015
Source: Matthew Plowright, article published on April 28, 2015 in http://www.ft.com

US$264 Billion. (That’s not Finland’s economy size, it’s what Chinese tourists will spend)

Book your holiday now, before a wave of 174 million Chinese tourists snap up the best bargains.

Already the most prolific spenders globally, the number of Chinese outbound tourists is tipped to soar further as the millennial generation spreads its wings.

Here are the numbers: 174 million Chinese tourists are tipped to spend $264 billion by 2019 compared with the 109 million who spent $164 billion in 2014, according to a new analysis by Bank of America Merrill Lynch. To put that in perspective, there were just 10 million Chinese outbound tourists in 2000.

How much is $264 billion? It’s about the size of Finland’s economy and bigger thanWealthy Chinese Businessman- Shanghai Travelers Club Greece’s.

“China-mania spread globally in the past few years, akin to when the Japanese started travelling some 30 years ago, when the world went into frenzy then, pandering to Japanese customers’ needs,” the analysts wrote. “In our view, this is going to be bigger and will last longer given China’s population of 1.3 billion vs Japan’s population of 127 million.”

Millennials, or 25- to 34- year olds, are expected to make up the bulk of Chinese tourists at 35% of the total, followed by 15- to 24- year olds accounting for around 27%.

“Chinese travelers now massively prefer to shop overseas. Buying a luxury product in Mainland China is seen as “Uncool” and shows that you can’t afford to travel to New York city, Paris or London to buy at the original brand ‘s flagship store” says Pierre Gervois, Publisher of the New York City based Shanghai Travelers’ Club magazine.

Advertisement Tower - Gervois Hotel Rating May 2017 featuring Pierre GervoisOnly about 5% of China’s 1.3 billion populace are thought to hold passports, meaning the potential for outbound tourism is vast.

The projected boom could be good news for the global economy. The Chinese are the world’s biggest consumers of luxury goods, with half of that spending done overseas. Chinese visitors to the U.S. have risen more than 10% since 2009, the fastest pace for a destination outside of Asia. Australia, France and Italy are also popular.

Asian markets stand to benefit, with the biggest uptick tipped for Japan, South Korea and Southeast Asia, according to the research led by Billy Ng in Hong Kong.

 

Source: Bloomberg.

Chinese Tourists Were Again Top Spenders Abroad in 2013

global-blue-pictureChinese travelers splurged the most on tax-free shopping last year, accounting for 27 percent of spending as they increased transactions by almost a third, according to Global Blue.
Russians were the second-biggest spenders with 17 percent, though they made the most transactions, while Indonesians placed third with 4 percent, Global Blue, the world’s biggest operator of tax-refund points, said in a study released today.
“The Chinese are easily the most numerous and highest- spending globe shoppers,” said Global Blue. “If the last decade is anything to go by, the amount spent will continue to increase, albeit at a slower rate than recent years.”
Advertisement Tower - Gervois Hotel Rating May 2017 featuring Pierre GervoisTotal spending by Chinese tourists increased 20 percent last year after tripling between 2009 and 2012. France is their favorite destination to spend in, ahead of Germany and Singapore, while fashion is the most important category, according to the study.
The number of Chinese outbound trips, excluding Hong Kong and Macau, will reach 60 million this year, from 53 million in 2013, and swell to 77 million by 2016, Global Blue estimates.
The figures are based on tax-free shopping transactions refunded by Global Blue and subsequently approved by customs, not the value of refund forms issued by retailers, which is greater, according to the study.
Global Blue estimates the total tax refund market is worth about 48 billion euros in the 37 countries where it operates.

Source: Bloomberg / Skift

To contact the reporter on this story: Andrew Roberts in Paris at aroberts36@bloomberg.net.

Chinese tourists spent $102 billion on foreign trips in 2012

Chinese tourists Chinese tourists Hermes store- China Elite Focusspent $102 billion on foreign trips last year, outstripping deep-pocketed travelers from Germany and the United States.
Chinese tourists spent 41 percent more on foreign travel in 2012 than the year before, beating the close to $84 billion both German and U.S. travelers parted with last year.
Tourists from other fast-growing economies with swelling middle classes, like Russia and Brazil, also increased spending in 2012. In recession-hit Europe, however, French and Italian tourists reined in their holiday budgets.
“The impressive growth of tourism expenditure from China and Russia reflects the entry into the tourism market of a growing middle class from these countries,” said UNWTO Secretary-General Taleb Rifai.
The German Travel Association (DRV) said it was to be expected that the Chinese would eventually overtake Germans in terms of spending, given that the country had more inhabitants than North America, Russia and Europe put together.
“But that they have overtaken us already is astonishing,” DRV president Juergen Buechy said.
The Chinese make more long-haul trips than Germans, who typically go to Mediterranean destinations, meaning that the average spend per holiday was greater, he added.
“This all new generation of  young & affluent Chinese travelers is much more sophisticated than their parents. They prefer to travel independently rather than in group tours, and take the time to choose carefully their hotel and shopping program well in advance” said Pierre Gervois, CEO & Publisher of the Shanghai Travelers’ Club magazine, a travel magazine for very affluent Chinese outbound tourists.
China is the world’s fastest growing tourist source market, thanks to higher disposable incomes in the world’s number two economy and looser foreign travel restrictions. Chinese tourists made 83 million foreign trips in 2012, compared to 10 million in 2000.
Hoteliers, tour companies, restaurants and even taxi drivers will need to brush up on their knowledge of Chinese cuisine, culture and language if they are to tempt them away from favorite destinations like Hong Kong, Taiwan and the Maldives, European tourism officials have said.
Other countries in the top 10 including Japan and Australia posted growth in travel spending, though only Russia came close to China’s huge growth, with a 32 percent increase in holiday budgets.
Russians are now the fifth highest-spending tourists, parting with $43 billion last year, according to the Madrid-based UNWTO, and catching up on the British, who spent $52 billion in 2012.
Italian spending dipped by 1 percent to $26 billion in 2012 and French tourists parted with $38 billion, a 6 percent drop year-on-year. The two euro zone peers were the only countries in the top 10 outbound markets to post declines.